Strawberry Wine

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Me being on this billboard is something every girl dreams about I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to do something like this it was an amazing experience I will never forget!

Me being on this billboard is something every girl dreams about I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to do something like this it was an amazing experience I will never forget!

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Love the scenery at this photo shoot. First time shoots don’t always turn out the way you think they will but you always learn something new in the end

Love the scenery at this photo shoot. First time shoots don’t always turn out the way you think they will but you always learn something new in the end

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murmurandshout:

The Teller (Smithville, TX, 1974)

Her name is Francis. She was a  teller from a small bank in Smithville Texas and she is the subject of  one of my uncle’s most memorable portraits. It hung on his studio wall  for years. I lost count of how many times he told me her story.
He  photographed thousands of people over three decades but said he’ll  never forget the girl with the curly hair and hazel eyes. “She was  always energetic in front of the camera but on this day, something was  very unusual. She sat motionless and quiet as if she was somewhere else.  It wasn’t the Francis I knew” he said.
I asked why she would  allow him to take this photo when she was clearly upset. He replied “I  don’t know why she was upset. I asked her if she wanted me to stop but  she said ‘no no keep going’ so I did. That’s when I took this shot. I  had no idea it would be her last photo… but maybe she knew.”
What was she thinking?
Just a week before this photo was taken, Francis was present during a robbery at the bank. She was unharmed.
Just two weeks after my uncle took this portrait, she disappeared and was never seen again.

Photographer and filmmaker Andrew Shapter is making a narrative feature about the disappearance of Francis Wetherbee. Watch a preview here.

murmurandshout:

The Teller (Smithville, TX, 1974)

Her name is Francis. She was a teller from a small bank in Smithville Texas and she is the subject of one of my uncle’s most memorable portraits. It hung on his studio wall for years. I lost count of how many times he told me her story.

He photographed thousands of people over three decades but said he’ll never forget the girl with the curly hair and hazel eyes. “She was always energetic in front of the camera but on this day, something was very unusual. She sat motionless and quiet as if she was somewhere else. It wasn’t the Francis I knew” he said.

I asked why she would allow him to take this photo when she was clearly upset. He replied “I don’t know why she was upset. I asked her if she wanted me to stop but she said ‘no no keep going’ so I did. That’s when I took this shot. I had no idea it would be her last photo… but maybe she knew.”

What was she thinking?

Just a week before this photo was taken, Francis was present during a robbery at the bank. She was unharmed.

Just two weeks after my uncle took this portrait, she disappeared and was never seen again.

Photographer and filmmaker Andrew Shapter is making a narrative feature about the disappearance of Francis Wetherbee. Watch a preview here.

(Source: captainsunbeam)